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2 edition of Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior found in the catalog.

Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior

F. A. Albini

Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior

by F. A. Albini

  • 129 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wildfires,
  • Winds

  • Edition Notes

    StatementF.A. Albini, D.J. Latham, and R.G. Baughman
    SeriesResearch paper INT -- 257
    ContributionsLatham, Don J, Baughman, Robert G, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination19 p. :
    Number of Pages19
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13605053M

    A Fire Weather Watch is issued to advise of conditions which could result in extensive wildland fire occurrence or extreme fire behavior, which are expected to develop in the next 12 to 48 hours, but not more than 72 hours. In cases of dry lightning, a Fire Weather Watch may be issued for the next 12 hours. "Estimating upslope windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior", USDA Forest Service Research Paper INT, 19 p., 16) Latham, D. J. "A lightning-locating and fire .

    A Qualitative Comparison of Fire Spread Models Incorporating Wind and Slope Effects David R. Weise and Gregory S. Biging ABSTRACT. Wind velocity and slope are two critical variables that affect wildland fire rate of spread. The effects of these variables on rate of spread are often combined in rate-of-spread models using vector addition. Convection Column. Rising column of heated air or gases above a continuing heat or fire source. Fire Spread. Since there are 60 minutes in an hour and just over 60 ft. (18 m) in a chain, using the rule of thumb will give you a reasonably accurate measurement of the fire's forward progress.

    FIRE BEHAVIOR CHARTS The values that are plotted on the fire behavior charts are based on a mathematical model for predicting fire spread in wildland fuels (Rothermel ). Calculations are made using nomograms (Albini a), computer (Albini b), or calculator (Burgan ). The model estimates actual fire behavior from specific descriptions. the Coupled Atmosphere-Wildland Fire-Environment (CAWFE) model and how it simultaneously models the evolving meteorological flow, fire behavior, and fire-induced winds. CAWFE ties a numerical weather prediction model to components representing the spread of a wildland fire and consumption of wildland fuels to simulate the impact ofFile Size: 2MB.


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Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior by F. A. Albini Download PDF EPUB FB2

The model is used to produce tables and graphs for estimating "midflame" windspeeds as needed for predicting wildland fire behavior.

The model applies on open or sparsely-forested slopes when there is otherwise no wind, from midday to late afternoon on clear summer days.

Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior. Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource.

Estimating windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior Item Preview Estimating windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior by Albini, F.

(Frank A.) This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library. See also WorldCat (this item).

Title. Estimating windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior / Related Titles. Series: USDA Forest Service research paper INT ; By.

Albini, F. (Frank A.) Baughman, Robert G. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah) Type. Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior / F.A.

Albini, D.J. Latham, and R.G. : F. (Frank A.) Albini. One of the factors that affect this phenomenon is terrain slope.

This paper used a Computational Fluid Dynamic solver called FireFoam to evaluate the effect of terrain slope on fire-wind enhancement.

The results revealed that the enhancement of wind velocity due to fire increases with an increase in terrain by: 2. The 10% wind speed rule of thumb for estimating a wildfire’s forward rate of spread in forests and shrublands wildland fire behaviour on an operational basis have been MAPE increase d.

INT-RP Predicting Behavior and Size of Crown Fires in the Northern Rocky Mountains INT-RP Relative Corrosivity of Currently Approved Wildland Fire Chemicals INT-RP Soil Disturbance Resulting From Skidding Logs on Granitic Soils in Central Idaho INT-RP   Downslope winds are very shallow and of a slower speed than upslope winds, generally mph.

The cooled denser air is stable and the downslope flow, therefore, tends to be laminar. Valley Winds are similar to and linked with slope winds. Their development each day generally lags hours behind that of slope winds.

Additional copies of this publication may be ordered from: The purpose of this appendix is to provide some basic fire behavior information that will enable a person with a moderate level of fire behavior training (S) to predict and calculate some basic elements of fire behavior and fire size.

In other words, the probability of ignition is the chance that the firebrand will cause an ignition when the right kind of firebrand lands on the right kind of fuel. Whether a wildland fire actually results from the ignition depends on the fire environment's ability to support and sustain burning.

The standard to determine the fire resistance level of a construction element can also be found in AS [16], AS [17], AS [18] and AS [19] respectively, for. Chapter 7. CONVECTIVE WINDS. Winds of local origin—convective winds caused by local temperature differences—can be as important in fire behavior as the winds produced by the synoptic-scale pressure pattern.

In many areas they are the predominant winds in that they overshadow the general Size: 1MB. bib1. F.A. Albini, D.J. Latham, R.G. Baughman, Estimating Upslope Convective Windspeeds for Predicting Wildland Fire Behavior, USDA Forest by: Estimating Upslope Convective Windspeeds for Predicting Wildland Fire Behavior, USDA Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Exp.

Stn, Ogden, UT Cited by: Fig. 2 shows the effects of terrain slope on wind velocity enhancement caused by a point source fire along the domain centerline.

Fire-induced longitudinal acceleration [] that is the prime reason for wind enhancement by fire is also depicted in Fig. 2 demonstrates that upslope terrain intensifies longitudinal acceleration induced by a point source fire and causes a greater wind Cited by: 1.

A Worksheet (above) designed to document a complete assessment for surface fire behavior and growth using either the lookup tables or the nomographs. EWS Tables for estimating Effective Windspeed from Slope and Midflame Windspeed. The Effective Windspeeds that result from these tables assumes that wind is blowing ± 30° from upslope.

Wildland fire behavior is primarily influenced by the local fire environment, which includes the fuel, weather, and topography in the area adjacent to the fire (Countryman ). Fuel and topography are usually considered static on the time scales relevant for fire behavior prediction but weather is both highly variable and dynamic (Barrows Cited by: 3.

Albini FA, Latham DJ, Baughman RG. Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Ogden, UT: USDA Forest Service; Research Paper INT Google ScholarCited by:   AbstractA wildland fire-behavior module, named WRF-Fire, was integrated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) public domain numerical weather prediction model.

Our range of wind speeds spanned the convective boundary layer regime, our regime of interest. Aids to determining fuel models for estimating fire behavior.

USDA Forest Cited by:. Albini FA, Latham DJ, Baughman RG () Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior. USDA Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, General Technical Report INTCited by: predicting wildland fire behaviour as documented in earlier reviews by Catchpole and de Mestre (), Weber (), Perry (), Pastor et al.

() and more recently by Sullivan (a,b,c). Fire behaviour models are typically distinguished into two main categories: (1) physical and (2) empirical or semi-empirical models.This work analyzed the first day's growth of the High Park fire, which occurred in Colorado's Front Range during widespread drought and an unseasonal June windstorm, assessing to what extent the Coupled Atmosphere‐Wildland Fire Environment coupled numerical weather prediction—wildland fire behavior model could reproduce the event, burn.